A Guide To Crawley by Easistore
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A Guide To Crawley

06 Jul 2016

A Guide To Crawley

Crawley, located in West Sussex, beautifully incorporates elements of town scenery and countryside. With a history dating back as far as the bronze age, Crawley wasn’t well known until the 1940’s when it was designated one of eight ‘new towns’.  The Government created eight self-sufficient ‘new towns’ in the 1940’s, each within 20 and 30 miles from the heart of London.

The town’s history can be traced back to the stone age by analysing flint tools and burial mounds and further on from these discoveries a Bronze age sword was uncovered. Crawley’s name was given by the Anglo-Saxon's, from which the spelling and pronunciation did not appear until around 1316. The arrival of the railway appeared in Crawley in the 1840’s, making the area more accessible whilst bringing a surge of visitors to the town.

Home to Gatwick airport, Crawley is situated halfway between London and Brighton and has an estimated population of 100,000 people and houses 13 neighbourhoods, with proposals for a 14th neighbourhood. Crawley is the largest inland town in West Sussex. The town is divided into a series of residential neighbourhoods, each with their own schools, shops and community facilities and is the ideal place for shopping and leisure activities, Crawley offers something for everyone.

Places to stay

Crawley is home to some of the most spectacular accommodation options, as well as nearby accommodation from Gatwick hotels and bed and breakfasts. One of the most spectacular hotels situated in Crawley is the Cisswood house hotel. A luxurious country hotel equipped with a beauty salon and leisure club.

Also situated in Crawley, within easy travelling distance of Gatwick, is Gravetye Manor. The Manor was built in 1598, the hospitality aspects of the Manor did not come in until 1958 before the Manor was a hotel it was used as a home. Today it offers superb facilities to all that visit, including a members club and rooms designed for long stays.

These are just two options of the large number of accommodation available when visiting Crawley. In addition to these options, there are camping sites, log cabins, bed and breakfasts and hotel inn’s available to all visitors.

Shopping

The County Mall in Crawley is one of the largest shopping centres in the south-east. The County Mall accommodates an estimated 70 shops in addition to cafes and restaurants. Easily accessible from the M23, most big name brands will be situated within the County Mall alongside other specialist shops.

As well as the County Mall, there are other shopping options available around the town such as Debenhams, H.Samuel, Goldsmiths, JD sports and Laura Ashley. Enjoy some retail therapy whilst visiting Crawley by exploring the quiet historic areas to the bustling high street and shopping centre.

After a busy day shopping in Crawley, there are plenty of restaurants and bars to relax in. With excellent transport in and out of Crawley centre in the form of bus links, cycle facilities and ample parking spaces there’s no reason not to visit.

Things to see

One place to visit whilst you’re in Crawley is Tilgate Nature Centre. Located in Tilgate Park the nature centre houses more than 100 different breeds of animals, including endangered species to farm animals. The centre also holds rare species of livestock such as white park cattle, Bagot goats and Boreray sheep.

Tilgate Park itself is set over 400 acres with activities to keep all entertained, including a golf course and the nature reserve. The parks access improvements will see a car park extension, disabled parking areas, resurfacing and relining of the main car park.

Crawley is also home to Crawley Museum and Ifield Watermill. Crawley Museum is located just off of Crawley Goff Park House. The museum displays artefacts from the history of the town, including the items used to date the town back to the bronze and iron age. There are temporary displays within the museum that change on a regular basis.

Ifield Watermill is thought to be the only working watermill in West Sussex that is still powered by its original water source. The mill was rebuilt after fire damage in 1683 and has been operational since. The watermill is now regularly open to the public and it continues to work for the community.

Easistore

Easistore Crawley is located on Maidenbower Business Park, easily accessible from the M23. Just a 10-minute drive from Crawley town centre, our self-storage facility is positioned for convenience. Storing your belongings with Easistore Crawley couldn’t be easier, with nearby shops, restaurants and accommodation options, as well as two nearby rail stations.